Summer Gamin’

August has been and gone, and it’s time to look back on another month’s gaming.

It endued up being a pretty mega month (although it didn’t necessarily feel like it at the time), with more gaming sessions logged than any other month this year, against ultra-low spending (I shelled out a grand total of a fiver on a Legendary Organised Play event).

 

Broadly speaking, August was a month for the classics: Zombicide, Arkham LCG, Legendary and LotR all got more than 5 plays, with a solid majority of gaming going on games that have now been played 5 times or more this year. Elder Sign also kept up its record as the only game to have been played every single month this year (although Zombicide only missed February, being far too big for a hospital table).

MassiveMassive Darkness was the big new arrival, which jumped straight in to the upper echelons (it’s currently the 17th most-played game of the year by sessions, 10th most-played by time) and I’ll be talking plenty more about it in the near future. The only other ‘new’ game to see play was a review – Near and Far arrived in July, but only hit the table in August (I liked it, but my wife hated it), and Codenames Duet which came too near to the end of the month to actually get played.

Thematically, it was a month dominated by Fantasy and Zombies, with Lovecraft and Comics coming in a little way behind. In light of that, it’s not a huge surprise to see that Surviving the Monsters (roughly 1/3) and Completing the Quest (about ¼ ) were the mechanical mainstays.

 

Kittens Whilst getting in big numbers of sessions for the classics was the main theme, I did spend a couple of days at Insomnia with the good people of Games Quest, and was able to cross off a few titles that I’d never been sufficiently interested in to buy, but felt like I ought to have a better awareness of as a gamer: Exploding Kittens has very little going on mechanically, and relies almost entirely on the group dynamics of people playing it (everyone present was quite happy to mess with everyone else, so it gave us an entertaining half-hour or so), and if you take away the anime art (presumably the main reason most people play it), Tanto Cuore is basically just Dominion with poor iconography. There were one or two interesting mechanical twists, but not enough to change my mind on this as a game I really don’t need to own.

 

Un-played

UnplayedAs I mentioned earlier in the year, I didn’t go into 2017 with an “un-played project” in anything like as systematic a way as last year, but now that we’re 2/3 of the way through the year, I’m starting to look at this in more detail. There are 8 games which are currently un-played, with 5 of them being big group/party games. There’s often a brief flurry of activity for games like this around Christmas, so historically this wouldn’t have been a big worry, but it’s hard to know how things will play out with a baby around. Of the remainder, Memoir ’44 is a game that I expect to have a few fallow years until Ned is big enough to play, but I’m intending to keep hold of, Scrabble is always worth owning a copy of, and only Firefly looks particularly dubious as a game to keep around – I like Firefly as a thematic homage to the world Captain Reynolds and his crew occupy, but the game itself has a very large footprint, a somewhat fiddly setup, and is overall just a bit too slow to make it to the table often: realistically, it’s only still around because of sentiment.

Final Thoughts

Comments With so much time going into what are now our Core Games, and Massive Darkness due its own write-up soon, there’s not too much else to say about August – in terms of reflecting on a year two-thirds gone, it feels like we’ve managed pretty well given just how difficult it is to get through a 2-hour game without stopping to be screamed at. With 2017 66% done, I’ve managed 65% of last year’s game sessions, but 75% of the gaming hours. I’ve also spent 75% of last year’s total, which is mildly concerning, but I’m not too bothered as I’ve sold 164% of what I shifted last year, which puts me in a much healthier position overall. I’m still narrowly clinging on to a net gain (more gained from sales than spent on stuff), but the Pledge Manager for Green Horde just opened, which will probably knock that on the head.

ApocryphaMoving into the home stretch of the year, the goals are pretty much the same as ever: keep playing, keep spending low. I’m still waiting on the majority of this year’s Kickstarters, even the ones that were aiming to deliver by August, so 2017 should still have some new twists in store, even if I don’t manage to land any of the particularly exciting autumn releases for review purposes.

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July’s Games

I quite enjoyed July from a games perspective.

NedOfTheRings
Ned still struggling with the idea of being allowed 2 copies of the same non-unique character in play at once…

July wasn’t really a month for ticking off many boxes or reaching new gaming milestones (although I did get my all-time H-Index up to 18) but I’d say it was fun nonetheless.

Money

A big-ish clearout saw me back in to positive figures for the year money-wise, as I got rid of a selection of games that hadn’t been played much in years, along with Star Wars Destiny, and some Dice Masters cards Rare enough to have a cash value. As I said back when I reviewed Destiny for Games Quest, I really like the mechanics and concepts in the game, but the price-point is just too high, and with the ongoing arrival of new sets (FFG are already starting to release spoilers for the 3rd wave, when I only got to about half of the cards in the 1st set), it basically becomes pay-to-win: I decided to get out ahead whilst I still could.

For Dice Masters, I’m basically restricted to a monthly event at the FLGS, and have missed the last 2 of those. I’ve decided to hold on to the bulk of my collection for when my son is old enough to play, but that’s probably 5+ years away and I wanted to get the balance sheet to a place where I didn’t have columns of red glaring back at me every time I looked at it in the meantime.

Keeping Track

July was also a good month for spreadsheets – I’ve been moving gradually away from just counting sessions of games to trying to count hours (a tricky task when you’re trying to use a formula rather than timing every session with a stop-watch [which would be an even trickier task when a single game can be interrupted multiple times by a single baby]), and a long spell of dead time in front the computer meant that I managed to get a new sheet sorted to monitor this for me – no huge surprises with what it threw up, but some pleasing graphs and charts nonetheless.

Play

LateJuneReviewsIn terms of what got played, July saw fresh life being breathed into old favourites as I made it to Lord of the Rings night at the FLGS for the first time in a while, completed the Dunwich Legacy cycle for Arkham, and we continued our slow trek across the sands of Egypt Osirian in Pathfinder Mummy’s Mask. In more recent acquisitions, Aeon’s End got dusted off after a couple of months hiatus, Mansions of Madness saw some play now that the Investigators have all returned from the painting table, and we managed a few more hours of Runebound, which were enjoyable enough, but definitely whet our appetites for the upcoming fully-cooperative expansions.

RobinsonHowever, it wasn’t just the old – I finally managed to get my teeth into a small pile of review games that had been sitting around for a while, with several run-outs for Arcadia Quest, Battle for Greyport, and Gloom of Kilforth. All of these were deemed worthy enough to keep around for a while (the PvP combat may eventually see Arcadia Quest moved on, but as killing-each-other games go, it’s a really good fun one). Battle for Greyport is remarkably enjoyable once you’ve managed to get your head around it, and Gloom of Kilforth is probably the best-looking game I own, even if the rulebook is awful. Speaking of awful rulebooks, I also picked up Robinson Crusoe in trade, which was a game I’d had on my radar for a fair while, simply on account of it being so highly ranked and supporting solo/co-op play. I’ve not had it long enough to form a considered opinion yet (played once, thought I was doing ok, then winter came and I died), but I’m certainly not regretting the trade.

Even Newer?

NewNewIn terms of new, new stuff, July was the arrival time for a whole heap of stuff for the world (or at least the UK) at large: Near and Far (the follow-up to last year’s Above and Below) an X-Men big box, which got me more excited about Legendary than I had been for a while, a new expansion for Eldritch Horror, and Lovecraft Letter (Love Letter becoming the latest game to get the inevitable Cthulhu treatment) all arrived on my doorstep. In light of that fairly epic haul, missing out on Sword and Sorcery really wasn’t too bad.

Runebound
This works well as PvE, but I’m looking forward to fully co-op

That new expansion to make Runebound fully Cooperative, and the long awaited Massive Darkness have both been sighted in the wild, but I’ve not managed to catch a glimpse myself (Runebound conspicuous by its absence on this side of the pond, Massive Darkness I now have a tracking number…) – in fact, none of my outstanding Kickstarters have landed yet (I have potentially have anywhere up to 6 due to drop between August and October), but the delay may well be for the best, as I try to clear some space (mental and physical) for them.

Numbers

Although July still fell short of the 60s and 70s of the early months of the year, there was a definite pick up from the low, low numbers of June, and I think 50 counts as a good number for the near future. Obviously there’s a bit of an issue with an ever-growing number of titles competing for a shrinking number of hours, but I’m hoping that we’re not too far away from getting the boy a proper bed-time, which should free up some evenings once again (you can laugh at me in a few months’ time when he still refuses to go to sleep.)

I also started looking at how this year’s gaming compares with that of previous years. The top 10 most-played games this year only account for 56% of my time, compared with 66% last year, and 88% the year before (in fact, in 2015 it was 70% of time just on the top 3).

Overall, 2017 is definitely the broadest year so far: looking at the number of games played, played 2+ times, 5+ times, 10+ times and 20+ times, I’m ahead of 2015 in every category, and although I’m still behind 2016, with 5 whole months to go, I expect to catch-up in a lot of those categories.

Looking at hours and percentages rather than sessions gives an interesting perspective, confirming that nothing is dominating like the last few years, although Zombicide is still going strong.

Playing what exactly?

KarubaNed
Someone seems a bit unhappy about losing at Karuba…

Thematically this was a very strong month for Fantasy, although Arkham Horror did a good job of holding up the Lovecraft banner, almost single-handedly for much of the month before the rest of the franchise piled in in the last week or so to make up the numbers. Mechanically, the good-old cooperative adventuring (survive the monsters, complete the quest, save the world) was the primary order of the day, with only very slight variations in theme.

July was also the month where I decided to stop and properly look at the categories I’d created for dividing up the aim of the games I play. Ever since I first started trying to do this, I’ve been aware of a certain unhelpful vagueness with solve the mystery/complete the quest/save the world/survive the monsters more-or-less bleeding into each other to the point where the distinctions aren’t that helpful.

Revisiting it, I decided to pull out the key element: most Mythos games are about solving a mystery: there probably are monsters to be fought, but that’s not why they’re there – Eldritch Horror was the only one I put under “save the world” in recognition of its epic scale, along with all the Pandemic titles, and other reality-as-we-know-it-is-at-stake sort of games.

“Survive the Monsters” became simply “Survive” which allows it to include Robinson Crusoe, but generally this category is for things where the peril has come to you, whether that’s a horde of Zombies, or an enemy army.

AvalonI also took all the table-top RPGs and a few similar-feel games out of “Complete the Quest” and put them into “Explore” in an attempt to reflect the open-world, lack of long-term objective nature of things. Complete the Quest remains a bit of a catch-all, but hopefully it’s a bit more coherent now, with the idea of a group having their own mission, something they set out to accomplish beyond simply surviving, but which might not (at least immediately) lead to the end of the world if they fail. This covers things like Pathfinder, but also things like Descent. It’s also where I’ve put all things Lord of the Rings, because it’s very rare that an LotR scenario will be a direct confrontation with Sauron to destroy the One Ring, generally, things are much more low-key and small-scale

In the final analysis, the only place I’ve left games in 2 categories are the ones with hidden traitor mechanics, where “find the traitor” still exists on my spreadsheet as a secondary mechanic (and the traitor’s victory condition is ignored). Ultimately, categorisation is still subjective, but it certainly feels a lot neater now.

 

Moving on

Whilst it’s pleasing to have things measured and labelled more neatly, the bottom line is that a fair amount of gaming happened in July, and most it was enjoyable and felt worthwhile. Aside from keeping an eye on what I’m spending, that always has to be the ultimate measure for gaming and, as things stand, I think I can be fairly content.

 

Boards of June

If May was slow, then June was slower. Having to travel for various family birthdays, the continuing trials of a baby who hasn’t read the book on sleeping, re-organising my house to give said baby a room of his own and (ironically) a long weekend at the UK Games Expo all got in the way of some more regular gaming sessions.

 

UKGE

UK Games Expo is the biggest weekend in gaming in the UK, and one of the biggest in the world these days, and it’s always good to make it along to this.

ukge Last year I was doing games demonstration, part of a big team that had grown even more this year, to the point where I believe they hit 100 demo-ers! This year I’d decided to head along with a slightly smaller party, joining the good folk from Games Quest.

It was certainly a gruelling time – long hours of fairly heavy physical work setting up on the Thursday, and an impromptu meeting in a hotel car-park on Friday night to unload a game that had accidentally made its way to Expo via Luxembourg. Saturday was the biggest day ever at UKGE in terms of attendees, and then the always long and wearying process of set-down / trying to figure out exactly what went where on Sunday before heading home.

Overall, it was a good weekend – aside from talking to a lot of people about a lot of board games, I also found myself on a stand that sold replica swords and magic wands. For anyone interested, Longclaw is quite nicely weighted (did I ever mention that I used to do sword-combat as a martial art?), but Needle feels better, if you know how to use a fencing blade properly. [disclaimer: all brandishing of swords was done when the hall was closed, and I wasn’t going to accidentally impale any passers-by].

I also got to have a bit of a look round, and a catch-up with the team behind one of the KS games I’m waiting on – unlike last year, I didn’t come away with any new games, but there were certainly a few things which caught my eye and I’ll be looking out for in the near future.

Mars The only disappointment with the weekend was the amount of actual gaming that got done – I’d hoped to get in at least one session of Terraforming Mars (a game which sits firmly in the “looks interesting, but too expensive to try” bracket for me), but ultimately we only managed a single game of Skull and a few rounds of Codenames. That said, the final round of Codenames in particular was one of the funniest I’ve ever witnessed as the opposing spymaster gave a clue which everyone except his 2 teammates understood, then watched them blunder around for ten minutes before accidentally stumbling on the right answers via sheer dumb luck. [ok, you probably had to be there].

Expo was the first time I’d spent nights away from home since my son was born, and I ended up going back to join him (and my wife) at my in-laws house on Saturday night. I hope to make it back to Expo again next year, but am learning the folly of making long-term plans without getting the baby’s permission.

 

What got played?

MahJong
My dad still doesn’t understand why everyone is laughing at his wall…

Bearing in mind the low overall level of gaming, June wasn’t too bad for crossing off games that had previously been unplayed – 3 days at my parents’ house ensured the inevitable dusting off of Mah Jong, and B-Sieged also made its first foray from shelf to table. I still have 15 unplayed games, some of which will be going up for sale soon, whilst others should get played reasonably soon.

There were a few fun new discoveries in June, perhaps the most surprising of which was Doom, a 1-vs-many board game from FFG, based on the computer game of the same name. I’d picked this up to review, and had expected to wheel it out to limited enthusiasm, possibly paint it, then sell it on, but found it went down surprisingly well. By contrast with The Others, a superficially similar game I reviewed last year, this game has a tight ruleset, streamlined gameplay and more customisation potential than you can shake a stick at. It’s not a short game by any means, but it still returned to the table, by request, on 2 out of the 3 nights following its initial introduction. The fact that it doesn’t lend itself well to 2-player means I’ll probably still end up moving it along, but an engaging diversion nonetheless.

 

Themes?

Doom-Board-Game-Box The rise of Doom also impacted the Theme and Mechanic break-downs for the month, with “Sci-Fi” and “Kill the Other side” being far more prominent than they have previously, (although “Kill the Other side” owes its prominence at least as much to Runewars). There was still a fair amount of the usual quest-completing-monster-beating-world-saving, but not in the overwhelming way it has been in the past. Lastly came the ever-helpful criteria that is “win,” which became a bigger element than normal.

Aside from that, Fantasy remains strong, with a sprinkling of Abstract, although it was a pretty lean month for all things Lovecraft – just a single session apiece for Mansions, Eldritch and Elder Sign, whilst Arkham LCG found itself caught in a lull as I tried to work out whether to re-build decks or wait for the next adventure (new deck arrived on the 29th, but didn’t get a chance to play it before the month ended).

 

Overall thoughts

Nedicide As we start to lurch towards something a bit like a routine, I get a distinct sense that the high levels of gaming we managed between January and April are phenomena of the past. Whilst I have hope that bed-times and regular naps might allow us to get a bit of structure back into life, a baby who is actually interested in the world around him takes more time and attention than one who basically lies around inert, and we’ve progressed much more rapidly to the grabbing stage of things.

GreenHorde The rather massive Kickstarter for Zombicide Green Horde (the successor to Black Plague) meant that June was the nearest I’ve come to admitting defeat in my attempts to have a negative overall spend on gaming for 2017: I’ve managed to claw things back towards zero by selling off a few unused odds and ends, but I’m still in the red right now.

Even if I don’t get back to negative spend, I don’t think that what I’ve spent looks at all shabby when compared to the hundreds of hours of gaming we’ve had (not to mention dozens of hours painting).

Right now my spending on gaming this year is up a fair bit on last year (69% of the spend after only 49% of the time), but with sales already at 131% of last year, I don’t think I’d be too worried, even if I didn’t know that most (hopefully all) of 2017’s bank-breaking Kickstarters were behind me.

I’ll continue to monitor my collection, and am already starting to consider moving along one or two favourites that others don’t share my enthusiasm for, and which I struggle to get to the table.

Whatever happens, I’ll keep gaming as much as I can, and when I have anything (hopefully) interesting to say, and the time to say it, I’ll keep posting on here.

The Games of May

Somewhat belatedly, it’s time to recap on what happened on our gaming table during May.

BlurryNed
Flailing so fast, his limbs are just a blur…

May was a much quieter month than any I’d seen so far this year gaming-wise, as work, family, weddings and who knows what else clamoured for my attention.

(Ok, who am I kidding, it was mostly just the baby and the need to catch up on sleep).

However, whilst I didn’t manage to get a lot of things on my to-do list finished, that doesn’t mean that May was completely gameless, as you’ll see…

 

Un-played

For one thing, May allowed me to cross a few more games off of the un-played list, as both of our Discworld games: Ankh-Morpork and The Witches made it to the table for the first time – Ankh-Morpork is a good game generally, although it has the potential to get rather frustrating as Random Events destroy all that you have built. Interestingly, for all its appeal, this one has only made it to the table twice in the past three years, and I’m often tempted to sell it, as it goes for silly figures on account of being out-of-print, but never quite get round to it.

Discs

The Witches is a much lighter, more family-friendly game – I didn’t really enjoy the game we played of it, as I got crippled by a string of shocking dice-rolls, and basically did nothing all game. Still, as something ideally suited for young children, it’s probably worth hanging on to in anticipation of when Ned can cope with something more complex than Peekaboo.

May also saw Super Dungeon Explore crossed off the list, as I sold it on – I picked this one up last year, and enjoyed a few early games that we played of it, but its sheer length, combined with the discovery of games like Mansions of Madness, Descent, and Eldritch Horror (not to mention others that are ‘coming soon’) mean that this wasn’t likely to see much more play, and didn’t really justify its place on the shelf.

 

x10

Dominion_gameDominion became the 11th game to make it to 10 plays, hitting the table 5 times early in the month, although it faded towards the end of the month. I’m still working on something Dominion-wise, but haven’t got nearly as far with it as I’d hoped, so that will have to be a story for another time.

There are several other games that are still heading in the right direction to hit 10 plays sooner rather than later, but I don’t want to pre-empt myself, so I’ll talk about them when they get there.

 

What got played?

Descent May was very heavy on Fantasy, easily accounting for over half of the month’s gaming. Within Fantasy, Terrinoth was the big new thing, about 1/3 of sessions, but over half of time, simply because Runewars and Descent are both multi-hour undertakings – I’ve got an article on Terrinoth cooking away somewhere, so I won’t say too much more on that now.

Lovecraft still made a significant appearance, with more Arkham Horror and Elder Sign, as well as a welcome return for Mansions of Madness, back in play after a long spell on the painting table. Overall, we were still mostly in a solve-the-mystery/complete-the-quest setting, although there was a fair amount of PvP “kill the other side” in Runewars.

 

May That just about brings me to the end of May (finally getting around to posting this on June 8th, which, the latest polls suggest probably isn’t  also going to be the end of May – the electorate showing a disappointing lack of concern for punning bloggers…)

Of course, June is UK Games Expo month, so expect that to shape gaming for the coming weeks, and even if I don’t manage an Expo article, I’ll be sure to report back all the highlights in the next monthly summary, in a few weeks’ time…

April Games

Only a few days later than planned, here’s a short update on a fairly quiet month…

 

10 of 10

MountainsApril had always seemed like it would be the month where I got to 10 of 10 – a fairly long way ahead of last year. I was on 8 of 8 at the end of March, and most of those 8 were already at 10 plays. Playing Legendary once more, managing to get in another couple of games of Eldritch Horror (new expansion for my birthday), and making it along to Destiny night for the first time in ages all had me right on the cusp.

Dice Masters was still hovering precariously on the brink, leaving me with 99 out of the 100 games played, in the end, we didn’t have enough people turn out for Rainbow Draft (Just me & the organiser), but we got a few games in, and that was the tenth one done.

 

Despite getting 100 games ticked off for the 10 of 10, April was a struggle overall. Having settled in at home, my son decided that sleep was an optional extra he largely wouldn’t bother with, only being coaxed into brief naps on me or on his mother: mildly frustrating during the day, and horrendous at night where my wife was regularly getting by on only an hour or two a night. Strangely enough, when dawn rolled around she had other priorities besides gaming.

Star-Trek-Frontiers-Board-Game-Box
Not for us in the end, but managed to swap it for a copy of Descent, which is pretty good going.

In that light, it made a lot of sense that April was a fairly quiet time on the “Unplayed” front – I finally managed to get Star Trek Frontiers played, reviewed, and traded away (much too dense a game), and also crossed off Dominion and Mapominoes, which still left 17 games left to play.

 

As I’ve said plenty of times before, 10 of 10 is just a guideline for trying to ensure a rounded approach to board-gaming, and “unplayed” is just an attempt not to waste money (or shelf space) – I’ll continue to monitor the collection, and what gets played over the coming weeks.

 

Themes

Sherlock-Jack-the-Ripper-Board-Game-Box
Jack the Ripper, not for the weak-stomached

Thematically, April was fairly heavily dominated by Fantasy, with 38% of time, and 48% of all gaming sessions occupied by this – within Fantasy, Gravehold (the setting for Aeon’s End) and Middle Earth each clocked up just under a quarter of the time, with the biggest individual setting being “generic” Fantasy (Dominion, Dungeon Time etc). Zombies were the next biggest area, followed by a healthy slice of all things Sherlock Holmes, and a sprinkling of Sci-Fi.

Mechanically things were a bit less clear – Completing Quests, Surviving Monsters, Solving Mysteries and generally saving the world were the big categories, racking up over 85% of time with their somewhat overlapping games. “Build the Best Place” was the only noticeable stand-out, at just over 10% of sessions, 7% or so of time.

 

Still brewing…

QuestionThere were a few noticeable shifts in April, games which found new games, new avenues of play, or whole areas opened up like Pandora’s Box. Most of them, however, I’m going to leave for another time – games that have only just arrived, or which warrant articles of their own. In this new, baby-filled world, I don’t want to promise anything, but I’m hoping that those articles are going to be ready sometime in May (or June, or later…)

March: 8 of 8

March was when we came home. Gone were the endless armies of midwives, the constant background noise from a dozen other babies, and the strange creaks and clunks of an ageing hospital.

Instead, we were back to just our little family at home – although our little family now included a tiny baby who doesn’t seem to think a lot of board games (or of sleeping, or being put down).

Once gain then, it was a very different month of gaming – there was still a fair amount of gaming happening, and a few more milestones reached, but with a definite shift.

8 of 8

7-Of-9
When I started drafting this article, I was on 7 of 9, which is somehow more satisfying…

Having reached 6 plays of 6 games in February, I was able to cross off the next level in March, with no fewer than 10 games making it up to 7 plays. By the end of the month, I’d gone even further, to 8 of 8.

Arkham Horror the card game was the first new game to cross the threshold this month. Arkham fits (just about) on the little folding table that goes in front of our sofa when our son is engaged in one of his mammoth feeds, so this was a relatively frequent appearance this month, being one of six games to tick past the “10 plays” marker. As an LCG, Arkham takes up more money than a lot of games, so it’s good to see it getting regular play.

Mummys-Mask-Card-Game-BoxPathfinder hadn’t really made it out of the box in 2017 prior to heading into hospital in February.

Once we were out though, I had the brand new Mummy’s Mask base set, set ready for reviewing (link will be added to the reviews section soon) – a return to form after a poor ending to the third set, this one leapt all the way up to ten plays in only a week or two. Lastly, the monthly Dice Masters meet-up rounded out the 8.

Aeon’s Beginning

aeons-end-card-game-boxI was also pleased that March saw Aeon’s End getting the table time it deserves, as I introduced it to my wife to generally positive feedback. After a victory in something roughly recreating the introductory scenario, we got thoroughly battered in most of our other games, but I still love the interactions, the decisions to be made, and the overall mechanics of the game.

There’s an expansion to this bubbling away on Kickstarter, and I must admit, I’m really torn: this type of marketplace game always thrives with more cards available, so getting this would seem like an obvious choice, but there are a few things about the project that I’m not thrilled by – I’ll talk more about that in a Kickstarter article I’ve got brewing elsewhere…

Turn of the Century: Zombicide

NecroAbom
Painting Zomnbicide has hit a bit of a backlog, so here’s a few older figures…

Due to its size (table space) and length (often 2-3 hours), Zombicide had fallen out of favour in February, and it only got 1 game in March. However, that single play was enough to take it not only to 10 sessions for the year, but 100 since we got it around this time last year. I’ve talked lots about Zombicide in the past, so I won’t wax lyrical any more today, but it’s still a fun choice when the baby allows.

Overall, I fell just short of having 9 plays of 9 games this month, but we’re definitely close, and I’m pretty confident that this year’s 10 of 10 will be done and dusted long before year end, probably by the summer – we already have over a dozen games played 6 times or more, and many of those will be looking to reach double figures soon.

 

Gathering Dust

Where March did see a big slow-down, was in games getting off of the unplayed list – with about 20 left to play, I’ll need to start giving this closer attention some time soon, as there’s only 1 or 2 I’d consider selling. Still, plenty of time left

 

What, How and How Much?

Investigators Book
I also picked up one of these recently – not a game, but a great tie-in product, and highly recommended to any Arkham Horror Files fan

In terms of theme and mechanic, March was something of a return to familiar ground. The thematic spread was fairly broad, with Lovecraft and Golarion being the biggest hitters, but there were significant appearances for Marvel, Tolkien, Zombies, Sherlock Holmes and a number of more generic settings

Cooperative was definitely the order of the day, with only a single game of Munchkin in the competitive column for most of the month, along with a scattering of Dice Masters and Zombie Dice as we reached the final days.

I sold a few more games in March, so gaming as a whole remains on a negative cost for the year. There are still some games which have dipped into the red in terms of value for money, with release schedules for Lord of the Rings and Arkham LCG getting ahead of us play-wise, and a rare re-stock for Mansions of Madness making me grab an expansion at a time when this rather lengthy game is struggling for table-time. As ever, I won’t be too worried, so long as I can drag things back on course long-term, but I’ll definitely be keeping an eye on those figures.

 

Looking forward

For the moment, it remains hard to guess how things will go over the coming months: predictability of nap times is a major factor in whether or not we can get games like Eldritch Horror back to the table any time soon, and feeds can take 20 minutes or 5 hours, which doesn’t exactly help with planning.

I hope that by the end of April, we will be back to something approaching a pattern, even if that’s a very different pattern to January and before. Who knows, maybe I’ll even get the chance to post a few proper articles, rather than just the monthly recaps…

February

 

February was always going to be a pretty important month for gaming in 2017. For one thing, this is often the time that New Year enthusiasm starts to peter out, and we get to see which games are going to have real staying power for the coming months. More importantly for us in 2017, February was going to be our last month of (relatively) undisturbed gaming, as my wife was expecting a baby in the middle of March. That made February a key time for getting games played, trying out anything that would be prevented by my being sleep-deprived, and generally making sure I didn’t have too many outstanding reviews left to do.

ned36
Not strictly a board game, but I like this picture, so I’m putting it in anyway…

It turns out that my son had different ideas. He decided that he didn’t want to wait for March 12th, and turned up on February 4th instead. That was something of surprise, to say the least. It also meant that February took place mostly in hospital, in the company of a tiny baby. Sadly, he’s been really quite ill, so had to stay in for a long while. Obviously, next to a child’s health, gaming is an incredibly trivial thing, That said, I’ve had plenty of time at home, trying to keep my mind busy, and my wife has barely been further from her bed than the hospital café in a month: in times like these, board-gaming is actually a really important distraction to stay sane.

 

With that in mind, February really hasn’t been a bad month gaming wise: by the time you factor in the month being 3 days shorter, overall numbers have barely dropped. That said, a whole new set of criteria have entered my decision-making process, including “Can I play this solo?” (already a slight consideration before), “Can I play this whilst hideously sleep-deprived?” “Can I play this on a tiny foldable hospital table?” “Can I safely take this somewhere without losing all the tiny pieces?” and “Can I play this without using my arms?” (Anything with a hand of hidden cards is out, but something like Carcassonne, where all information is public, works well).

sherlock-consulting-board-game-boxSan Juan, Race for the Galaxy, Dobble, and Star Wars Carcassonne, all scored highly in several of these categories, and made it to the table repeatedly. Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective, and its Lovecraftian sibling Mythos Tales also get a good mark on the “play with no hands” chart, and we had a few enjoyable, if drastically unsuccessful sessions of these. Other games like Coup and Braggart got briefer revivals, but proved to be fairly lacklustre with only 2 players. Still, along with single run-outs for a handful of other games, I’m now well past the half-way mark in playing all the games I own this year.

 

6 of 6

Where February did prove a challenge, was getting games back to the table for the repeat play-throughs needed to get higher counts. I spent most of the month watching the 10 of 10 challenge languishing on 5 of 5, with Legendary and Arkham Horror failing to get that 6th game- this was particularly frustrating for Arkham, as this was the game that I’d spent the most money on this year, but there really are too many different piles of cards and little tokens to risk taking this one to the hospital. In the end, I made it to our Monthly Dice Masters meet-up on the 26th, to finally hit 6 of 6.

Elder Sign, a game which definitely pushes the limits of what’s practical for transportation, did make a couple of fiddly trips and was the first to pass the 10 plays barrier for the year. Zombicide will doubtless join it soon after we get home, and there are a host of other games which have been kicking their heels all month: Legendary – recently enhanced with the Deadpool expansion – the new Mummy’s Mask set for Pathfinder, and Mansions of Madness all still seem likely to hit the big numbers as the year goes on.

As I think about finishing this year’s 10 of 10 challenge (some months from now), I have been back to BGG and checked again – neither Peekaboo, nor Steal Your Nose has a Board Game Geek entry (to be honest, my son’s not very good at those games either, but they seemed more appropriate than Eldritch Horror.) At least we’re a few months away from grab-and-chew.

 

Something New

The unexpected baby made his impact felt on the reviews I do for Game Quest, just as much as it did on playing for domestic purposes. I managed to get a couple finished off in the early weeks of me being alone at home and mum & baby stuck in hospital, but others needed to wait a while longer: I don’t want to spoil the stories of Mansions or Pathfinder (as noted above, these were not practical for transporting to hospital) and that fat, dense rulebook is still sat there in the corner, just daring me to risk my sanity by taking on Star Trek Frontiers.

Amongst this brain fog of exhaustion there was something unusual though. It’s very early in the year to be touting a game as a potential “Game of the Year,” but I think that this might be it.

aeons-end-card-game-boxAeon’s End was a big Kickstarter last year that’s attracted a lot of hype. It’s a cooperative Science-Fantasy Deck-builder that can probably best be described as a cross between Dominion and Legendary, although it certainly has plenty of unique features of its own.

As always, go to Games Quest and read the full review there to get the big picture, but a few key highlights:

Legendary style, the players are working together to take down a big baddy, who will have his own stats and unique abilities, plus a deck from which he throws out some randomised pain at the players every turn.

Rather than a Legendary style HQ though, players are building their decks from a Dominion-style market: at the start of the game you select 9 cards (3 gems, 2 relics, 4 spells), and they’re all available to buy from the word go – until they run out.

The biggest twist in Aeon’s End is that you don’t shuffle your deck: once your deck runs out, you just flip over your discard pile to form a new deck – given the amount of time you spend shuffling in a standard deck-builder, this is a really big twist. The only shuffling that goes on is in the turn-order deck, which randomises when in the course of each round you get to act, and when the Nemesis (boss bad-guy) does.

It’s also worth noting that in Aeon’s End you play as a specific character, each with their own unique ability, and a different starting configuration of breaches – the portal used for casting spells.

I’ve not had a chance to do any more than scratch the surface of Aeon’s End yet – I got the higher-level Kickstarter edition of the game, which gives me extra gems, spells and artefacts for the market, extra Breach Mages to play as, and extra Nameless monsters to face down. From this first look though, it seems great, with loads to recommend it in terms of art, back-story, and above all game-play. The fact that it’s cooperative means that there’s a chance of getting to the level of depth in experimenting with market combinations and strategies that I could never manage with Dominion (due to a lack of opponents who wanted to play that much Dominion).

 

The Future

I have no idea what March will hold. I’m fairly optimistic that having our little boy at home won’t completely stop us from gaming (although right now, I’d prepared to give it up if that was going to get him better and home from hospital). Hopefully in a few weeks, I’ll be some way towards figuring out what “normal life” looks like now, and will be back to posting here a bit more frequently.